Wedding Wisdom

Managing Personalities Throughout an Event

By Kim Sayatovic, Belladeux Event Design

When you think about planning an event, you probably think about timelines, vendor communication and all of the nitty gritty details that go into the final product. However, if you think back to all of the events you’ve worked on, there’s surely one other task you’ve performed: managing all of the various personalities you encounter along the way.

From couples to vendors to parents, it always seems as if everyone has a say one way or another. With that in mind, it’s essential for all event professionals to become experts at managing personalities – this will make the process much smoother and will ensure that you maintain control of the event.

Friends and family

Many of the personality conflicts that come up throughout planning can be attributed to a couples’ loved ones who want their opinions to be considered above the clients themselves. This can be tricky, as some events involve divorced parents, which generally is a sensitive situation as is. When this happens, it’s important to remember that your clients are your priority – keep them in mind when you make all decisions.

If a friend or family member continues to cross the line, I make a point to talk to them on the side and explain how important the wedding day is to the couple. If they are stubborn and refuse to appease the couple, then I let them know it’s their choice if they want to sit it out.

You were hired by the couple so it’s your responsibility to meet their preferences.

Vendors

In some cases, you’ll find that it’s other vendors that can cause difficulties. The way you handle this situation will depend on where you are in the planning timeline. If you’re still early on and you find a vendor is causing issues, then your best bet is to give them a call and discuss their participation in the event. If they don’t step it up, then it may be time to talk to the couple about replacing them.

If an issue comes up later in the planning process and there’s no time to replace a vendor, then it’s up to you to settle the differences – at least until the end of the event. Call a face-to- face meeting with anyone involved and get to the bottom of the problem as early as possible.

Remind them what matters in the moment – the couple and their event.

Clients

We’ve all faced clients with unrealistic expectations or those who come with a bit of an attitude. It’s never an easy situation, but don’t let them get the best of you – be respectful no matter what and always, always be honest and professional. The only thing you can do is to be open and explain your side of things. If they are unmanageable and refuse to change their ways, then it may come to the unfortunate task of letting a client go. Make sure that your contract includes a clause that nullifies the agreement if the client crosses any lines, but ensure that your retainer is still guaranteed for the work that you’ve done. Remember: your mental health is not worth the invoice from a stressful client.

For most events, you probably won’t need to worry too much about the people you’re working with – weddings are a happy business and tend to attract like-minded people. However, when an issue does creep up on you, it’s always best to be prepared to find the solution.

Kim Sayatovic is the Founder and Chief Creative Officer of Belladeux Event Design, a full service wedding and event design firm based in New Orleans, Louisiana.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tria is Timeline Genius' Content Manager. She is also the founder of Honey & Twine Weddings and Events. She lives, writes, works, and dreams of owning a cat or two in San Francisco.

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